Locations map

Locations map

1. Chemawawin Cree Nation
2. Misipawistik Cree Nation
3. Little Saskatchewan First Nation
4. Lake St. Martin First Nation
5. Kinonjeoshtegon First Nation (Jackhead)
6. Poplar River First Nation
7. Berens River First Nation
8. Miskooseepi First Nation
9. Garden Hill First Nation
10. Little Grand Rapids First Nation
11. Pinaymootang First Nation

1. Chemawawin Cree Nation (Easterville)
Chemawawin Cree Nation is inhabited by the Cree Indians. The First Nation is signatory to Treaty 5 signed in 1875 Post Confederation Class. In 1963, Chemawawin First Nation was relocated from Reserve No. 1 to Reserve No. 2 when the Grand Rapids hydro station was constructed and extensive areas of the Reserve were flooded. Chemawawin First Nation No. 2 is located adjacent to the Community of Easterville on the south-east shore of Cedar Lake approximately 400 air kilometers north of Winnipeg. The First Nation covers an area extending southeastward from Easterville along PR #327. In 2006, the population of Chemawawin was 1213 people on reserve and 303 people living off reserve.
Pathway Camp Ministries was pleased to provide a Spring Break Day Camp for the youth in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Summer Day Camps have also run in July during the years of 2011-2015 and a bi-weekly Kids’ Club was held in their school over the 2012/2013 school year.
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2. Misipawistik Cree Nation (Grand Rapids)
Misipawistik Cree Nation is located on PTH# 6, 420 kilometers north of the City of Winnipeg. Misipawistik Cree Nation is situated at the mouth of the Saskatchewan River where it runs into Lake Winnipeg, downstream from Manitoba Hydro’s Grand Rapids hydroelectric station. Misipawistik Cree Nation is located in the east and south banks of the Saskatchewan River, immediately across from the town site of Grand Rapids.
Misipawistik Cree Nation is a community of 591 (Statistics Canada, 2001 Census) and the Town of Grand Rapids, a community of 355 (Statistics Canada, 2001 Census). Misipawistik Cree Nation constitutes the part of the community which is located on reserve land, and is governed by Chief and Council.
Pathway Camp Ministries has a long history with Misipawistik Cree Nation including regular Clothing Sales, Gym Nights, Weekend Sports Days, Kids’ school programs and seven years of summer Day Camps for the youth.  A weekly Youth Group is held in the Band Hall on Tuesday evenings from 7-9 p.m. for those 12 years and older.  We are grateful for the use of this facility and thank the Chief and Council for their support.
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3. Little Saskatchewan First Nation
Little Saskatchewan First Nation is an Ojibway community located on the western shore of Lake St. Martin in the North Interlake region of Manitoba. The population is 934 registered members (2003 statistics) and their language is Saulteaux, an Ojibway dialect. Due to their close proximity to the Pathway home base, we have held numerous programs in Little Saskatchewan, from Gym Nights to Sports Days, from Summer Day Camps for the last 3 years to after-school programs. Due to the unfortunate flooding situation along the Fairford River and the shores of Lake St. Martin, the summer Day Camp since 2011 has had to be cancelled and was relocated to another community.
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4. Lake St. Martin First Nation
Lake St. Martin First Nation is named for the lake on which it is situated. Just up the road (and the lake) from Little Saskatchewan, this community is on the north end of Lake St. Martin and is also an Ojibway community with the Saulteaux dialect. Also called The Narrows, Lake St. Martin had a 2003 population of 1,912 members, although not all on reserve. Pathway has held numerous Clothing Sales in this community and while we do not host a Day Camp on site, for two summers, twenty of their youth commuted to Little Saskatchewan to join the activities each day of summer camp. Flooding has affected the area since 2011 resulting in an evacuation of the community. We hope to become involved again when the community members have returned or when it is relocated elsewhere in the Interlake.
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5. Kinonjeoshtegon First Nation (Jackhead)
Jackhead is small Ojibway community on the western shore of Lake Winnipeg. 2003 statistics report a population of 609 registered members. The community is approximately 350 km north of Winnipeg and is accessible by road. Pathway has had limited contact with Jackhead through their Clothing Ministry, but was pleased to run their first youth event, a Gym Night, in late February 2011. Our first Summer Day Camp for this community was held in Jackhead in August 2011, followed again with a program in summer 2012.
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6. Poplar River First Nation
The Poplar River Reserve #16 is a Treaty 5 Adhesion, and is situated at the mouth of the Poplar River (Asatiwisipe) on the northeast shore of Lake Winnipeg. Poplar River First Nation has a population of approximately 1,200 (over 900 on reserve). The community lies about 400 kilometers north of Winnipeg and is accessible by air, and by winter road between January and March. In the summer months, a barge service also operates on Lake Winnipeg. Poplar River, like Berens River and Bloodvein communities to the south is an Ojibway community where Saulteaux is spoken. Pathway began with 3 years of summer Day Camps and returned to the community (including travel over the winter roads) to hold Clothing Sales and gym events for the youth. After being unable to schedule a week for 2011, Day Camps recommenced in Poplar in July 2012 and continued from 2013-2015, for a total of seven summer programs.
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7. Berens River First Nation
Berens River First Nation is an Ojibway Nation situated approximately 270 air kilometres north of Winnipeg on the east shore of Lake Winnipeg at the mouth of the Berens River (391 kilometers by road on Provincial Road #304 when the winter roads are officially open). The community is serviced by air transportation and a community barge for freight shipments during the summer. The 2009 statistics were 1,762 people living on-reserve and 1,003 people living off-reserve.

Pathway Camp Ministries began a relationship with Berens River in 2009, holding Clothing Sales and providing a Day Camp in the summer for the youth. Day Camps have been held annually each summer for seven seasons and we return to the community as often as possible to stay in contact with the youth.
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8. Miskooseepi First Nation (Bloodvein)
Miskooseepi First Nation is situated along three kilometres of shoreline at the mouth of the Bloodvein River, 210 kilometres north of Winnipeg on the east shore of Lake Winnipeg. This Ojibway Nation has an on-reserve population of 942 (2009 statistics) and 550 off-reserve. The community was accessible by air, by winter roads (officially open around January 15th to March 15th) and by a ferry/ barge service (39 passenger vehicle), operated by the Marine Division of the Department of Highways during the summer months. In November 2014, the bridge over the Bloodvein River was officially opened, making year-round vehicle travel possible to the community.

Pathway Camp Ministries provides regular Clothing Sales, and summer Day Camps for the youth (from 2008-2015), returning to the community as weather and schedules allow. Our Filmmaker project was also held in Miskooseepi in May 2010.
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9. Garden Hill First Nation
Garden Hill First Nation is situated on Island Lake in the far northeast corner of Manitoba, Canada and is adhesion to treaty No. 5. The reserve covers approximately 18,180 acres. It is located 610 km northeast of Winnipeg and is only accessible by winter road when the season is open and by air. The language in the community is Oji-Cree, often referred to as the Island Lake Dialect. With 3971 registered members, it is a large remote first nation. Some recreational activities include: fishing, sledding, and annual events such as the Winter Carnival and Treaty Days. A last-minute Day Camp held in Garden Hill during the summer of 2006 was the inspiration for the formation of Pathway Camp Ministries. We have returned 8 times during the summer and hold our largest camp in this community (average of 82 children/day in July of 2014).
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10. Little Grand Rapids
Little Grand Rapids First Nation is an Ojibway fly-in community located on Family Lake, approximately 280 km northeast of Winnipeg. It is accessible by float planes in summer and by winter roads in the winter. Between these seasons, access from the local airport to the community is by boat or helicopter. Pathway was pleased to hold its first Clothing Sale in Little Grand Rapids in Dec. 2011 and has returned since. We look forward to developing further relationships with this community.
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11. Pinaymootang First Nation
Pinaymootang First Nation (also known as Fairford) is a Saulteaux community situated on Hwy. #6 approximately 240 km northwest of Winnipeg. The community extends along the Fairford River that flows into Lake St. Martin. This vibrant community has many amenities (e.g. an arena, restaurant, gas bars, churches, fitness centre) and a local school that includes High School with a total school enrolment of approximately 350 students. Pinaymootang was affected by the flooding of 2011, with the loss of many homes. New housing is currently arriving in the community as the affected families are being relocated. Due to its proximity to Pathway’s office, our staff has been pleased to run lunchtime Kids’ Clubs and after-school Bible studies in the School, a weekly Youth Group held in the House of Prayer church hall, Youth Alpha classes, Women’s Groups of Hope, and Clothing sales. A Day Camp was also held during Spring Break 2013 – 2015 for the youth.
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